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GOSA AWARDS MCAA $15,000 FOR STATEWIDE INNOVATION IN TEACHING COMPETITION

GOSA AWARDS MCAA $15,000 FOR STATEWIDE INNOVATION IN TEACHING COMPETITION

MCAA_Innovationlab_elementary_20180918_00035Media Specialist and Technology Coach Amy Crandall of Marietta Center for Advanced Academics (MCAA) was recently awarded as a Governor’s Office of Student Achievement (GOSA) Innovation in Teaching winner. The statewide competition rewards teachers who utilize innovative instructional strategies to advance student achievement. This year’s competition focused on blended and personalized learning applied with a focus on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics). 

“The winners of the Innovation in Teaching Competition are model educators for teachers both in Georgia and across the country,” said Rebecca Ellis, Director of Innovation at the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement. “We are excited to honor them for their continued dedication to the art of teaching and to their students’ academic achievement, as well as share their resources with educators across the state.”

As 1 of 3 winners from across the state, Amy will receive a $5,000 stipend, and MCAA will receive a $10,000 grant to support innovative instructional strategies. In addition, she will be highlighted by Georgia Public Broadcasting with an opportunity to discuss effective instructional strategies, management techniques, and the winning instructional unit. Amy’s video and teaching resources will be available online for other educators, educational institutions and the general public.

“MCAA is proud of Mrs. Crandall and we are excited about the future innovative practices that this grant will help her accomplish,” said MCAA principal Dr. Tricia Patterson. “Mrs. Crandall is leading the way in technology integration and we appreciate the Department of Education for recognizing her.”

The other two winners include; Kathleen Lanman of J.C. Booth Middle School in Fayette County, and Terra McMillan of Thomson Middle School in Houston County.

The competition was made available through Georgia’s Innovation Fund.